Is the air getting thinner?

Is the air getting thinner?

Mac Book Air, 3.0 pounds, 0.16-0.76 inches thick, 13.3-inch display, 1.6GHz /1.8GHz Intel Core 2 Duo CPU, 80GB hard drive, Backlit keyboard, Multi-touch trackpad, iSight camera,No optical drive, Must be caressed to be believed

 

Steve Jobs’ opening bow at Mac Expo 2008 was uncharacteristically late by some 10 minutes, but the news he had to share was completely on time if one believes that keeping pace with the forward march of technology (and all its digital lifestyle overtones) is important. From the time-saving Time Capsule to the well-timed iPhone enhancements to the “Will they stand the test of time?” big-ticket items—iTunes movie rentals, Apple TV Take Two, and the impossibly thin MacBook Air—Expo ’08 marked Apple’s first year as a rightfully placed consumer electronics juggernaut, with multiple prongs of attack jutting from its ever-determined center.

 

Because this is about sooo much more than the iPod now.

 

With an increased emphasis on Apple’s near-trademarked simpler and easier promise, the keynote itself signaled that Apple has been thinking long and hard about business synergy and product evolution, as well as building on its incredibly significant iPhone achievements. Nonetheless, the basic question remains: Despite all the cheerleading that a Steve Jobs’ keynote inspires in us, are any of the four announcements, historically speaking, significant?

 

We Mac|Lifers are aiming to find out. In the next six pages we answer all your questions about how important the four announcements really are, and what they really mean for our beloved technology totems, our businesses, and our lives. So come with us as we separate historical fact from hysterical fiction, and handicap how history might judge The Four Announcements in the foreseeable future—on, say, the eve of Mac Expo 2009.

 

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