Apple Final Cut Studio 2

Apple Final Cut Studio 2

DVD Studio Pro. The strangest thing about Final Cut Studio 2 is that one of its most popular applications - DVD Studio Pro - remains virtually unchanged, stuck at version 4-point-whatever. Apple won’t say why, but our guess is that the company has more work to do in supporting one or both of the high-definition DVD standards that are duking it out these days (HD-DVD and Blu-ray). But with high-def disc formats picking up steam, we think Apple will offer a DVDSP update sooner rather than later. Hope springs eternal.

 

Compressor 3. Compressor lets you convert video and audio from one format to another (for example, take an uncompressed HD movie and compress it to a smaller size that’s ready for the Internet or the iPod). Compressor gets a new interface that shows you all of its components together (settings, previews, batch progress), so you don’t have to call them up separately. But Compressor should really be easier to use. We wish it automatically preserved the aspect ratio of our source material so we didn’t need a calculator to do the math ourselves. We wish it could name different versions of the same encode sequentially (mymovie1.mov, mymovie2.mov) instead of asking us to manually rename each instance. And we wish Apple would finally solve the dreaded “Cannot submit to batch” error, which seems to occur randomly and stops the app in its tracks.

 

The bottom line. Without a doubt, no other video/film production software suite can offer as much as Final Cut Studio 2. Avid’s software is less an integrated suite and more a confederation of independent apps that still manage to miss key functions (such as DVD authoring). Not even Adobe’s new Production Suite, which launches in the fall, can quite match Final Cut’s tools when it comes to pure video production.

 

COMPANY: Apple

CONTACT: www.apple.com

PRICE: $1,299; upgrades from $499

REQUIREMENTS: 1.25GHz G4 or faster or Intel processor, Mac OS 10.4.9 or later, 1GB RAM (2GB recommended for compressed HD or uncompressed SD video; 4GB for uncompressed HD), Quartz Extreme graphics card (top-tier cards highly recommended for Motion and Color; no integrated Intel graphics of MacBooks)

Offers a pro-level app for each step of the production and distribution process. Includes a host of new features that save time and improve output. Apps work seamlessly together. Competitive price.

Beefy requirements for some apps. DVD Studio Pro unchanged (no Blu-ray support). Color application features a different interface.

 

 

3

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

benet

Were not smart, but also learn from others bald.omega watchesChing had no water to fish, one to the cheap is invincible.replica watchI left Dragon, White Tiger right shoulder tattooed Mickey Mouse.replica watchesEfforts should be made! ! For your Audi Dior me.cgfrt

avatar

dance

That makes it much easier to edit the high-quality HD footage used in broadcast TV and film, without the pricey RAID storage systems and other add-on cards that high-end HD usually requires. Very helpfull.

avatar

Anonymous

Sony hasn't finished the specs for blu-ray. How can Apple give support to a format that has no specs defined. And yes this also means that a blu-ray player bought today may not be able to reproduce certain features from tomorrow's discs...

I guess Apple is waiting for Sony to update blu-ray and to see who s going to win this war, by bet is with Blu- Ray but it is still too early to tell...

Log in to Mac|Life directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.