How Steve Jobs Helped Save Music and Why Jon Bon Jovi Might Just Be Right

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IHateSnow

I no longer feel the need to use file sharing sites to get music because I don't feel I'm taking a chance on new bands, and songs I haven't yet heard on the radio. IMHO iTunes has made great strides towards saving the music industry, albeit a far different business model. Mr. Bon Jovi is being very short sighted and is completely out of touch with all the necessary and inevitable changes in the world due to technology.

Fabulous article.

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Ray Aguilera

Just for that, I'm going to go home and rock out to my vinyl copy of Slippery When Wet, which I purchased at a record store for $1.00 (which, frankly, tells you all you need to know about what even Bon Jovi's best output is worth).

 

Of course, Jon Bon Jovi didn't see any of that buck, so I guess record stores are killing the music industry, too.

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macbookpro220

Nice job Robbie. I enjoyed your article. I am just a teenager and never had those record store experiences but I agree with your pints. I am against pirating and buy all of my music legally on iTunes. I think Jon Bon-Jovi is on his own with this one....Or at least mostly. And to directly blame Steve Jobs is a little Far fetched.

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lopezzi

I think you mean Long's Drugs, not Gong's. And I totally agree with you. Also KROQ is the best radio station out there. I'm super excited to find they stream it on iTunes now, now that I no longer live in SoCal.

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Roberto Baldwin

No really, Gong's Drugs. It was a family owned drug store. The store went out of business once KMart came to town, but Mr Gong is a pharmacist at the KMart.

He's really a great guy.

-Robbie

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chad1776

I too bought the Me Phi Me album. Those were the days when you'd take a gamble and more times than not, lose. Because of the internet, and especially iTunes, I have found artists I absolutely love and making those mistakes rarely happens anymore.

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Philodina

I am an even older, more cranky guy than Jon and I completely disagree. Not only is Baldwin spot on historically but if anything, electronic distribution of music has made it FAR easier for songwriters and musicians to be heard. Maybe not to get rich, but to be heard and to attract an audience. Back in the "good old days" luck, family connections, playing for years in bars and small clubs that represented a very limited market and other means reflecting a limited market were the primary ways that artists were "discovered." Today, you may not be that good, you may not have staying power, but the entry costs to the music business are low and a wide audience can decide if they like you. There are even more recording companies than there were 40 years ago. The only real downside is the theft of intellectual property which is much easier than it used to be.

The new environment may not be conducive to people making "Jon Bon Jovi" money anymore but it also places the market closer to the consumer and improves the ability of new artists to be heard and judged on their merits.

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Roberto Baldwin

I was in a punk band in the early 90s and we couldn't even dream about getting signed and anyone hearing our music besides people that came to our shows.

Now I can record a demo at home with Garage Band, upload my songs to iTunes, shoot a video and place it on YouTube, and engage social media to promote a gig for a tiny fraction of what it cost to have CDs created back in the "good ol' days."

Like you said, most people will never get the "Slippery When Wet" money Bon Jovi enjoyed, but getting people to hear your music is all most artists want.

-Robbie

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jgreer3000

Excellent article. The music industry were ripping us off for years. Buying whole albums for 15 dollars and only having 2 good songs on there. The music industry wants to hold on to there old model instead of changing with the times.

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vielledent

I totally relate to this story and bon jovi is a chomp

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Jamie

All I can say is I agree 110% (+1). Excellent piece. May we never got through the dark ages of the mainstream rock of the late 80s again. Well done indeed, Mr. Baldwin.

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viscara

Agreed... Also I love indie music off all types giving back the power to the individual artist with "True" talent versus the spoon fed garbage of what the Record companies call "Musicians?" Let the people hear and buy music on their own judgement of what is good or not good not what is "SOLD" to us... The record industry can pucker up and kiss my royal American Independent A$(*$)#@!

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mateozzz

I think he would be correct if he said that major labels might get killed, they don't add any value anyway, unless you count promoting 20 bands that sound just like the last one that was successful.

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stevedion

Wow, title should read how Steve Job's saved the music industry. Before iTunes, i would download from Napster, Kazaa and other illegal places. I would get a bunch of low quality music, bad tags and worst of all viruses (i was a PC user back then, hehehehe). Then iTunes came along with affordable music and clean tags, good sound quality and great place to manage all that music. I spend much more money buying music then i ever did, and i am sure that most adults buy their music from online places legally. Teens and students are the ones who still currently download most music illegally and there is a good reason for that, they have no money, it all goes on school etc... I remember when i was a student i didn't buy much albums, i would buy one once in a while and share with other friends. How is that much different?

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MacAddict4Life

Great article!

One correction: But the point is, buying music without knowing anything about it was my downfall far too many times than I want to share.

This should be "...far more tines than I wish to share."

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drswami

correct

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Vren Lyet

Everything you wrote is absolutely right!

Again and again, I find myself purchasing music in iTunes that I'd never have bought anywhere else - let alone on such an antiquated form of digital media like the compact disc…
I myself have never ever been to a record store, and today, with iTunes everywhere on my Apple products and by that tons of music only a click/tap away, why should I now?

But I don't think anything has been "killed" - consuming music is just different today than it was some 20 or 30 years ago - but then again, really, what hasn't changed since then?

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Avenged110

great article. If iTunes had never come along, I wouldn't have even know about most of the artists I love today.

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macbookpro220

You are absolutely right. The radio stations in my area are awful. Pandora is great!

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treswrld

Let's be honest, Jon. Record execs and RIAA killed the music industry as you knew it. They were too busy trying to kill the technology with lawsuits instead of embracing it like the crew in Cupertino. Funny how there are plenty of artists who are making a decent living in this digital music age. Personally, I don't miss paying for a whole album only to get a few good songs. Nostalgia is one thing - ignorance is another beast altogether. No sympathy for Mr. Bon Jovi from me.

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