The Future of Apple Design: 2012 Applevision

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jedy

Forget all the analysing and speculating, if Apple make this thing and it has a glossy screen like all their current screens do (save for laptop custom purchases) this will ruin all the technology they implement into it. The only reason I tollerate my laptop (bought for me by my college so stuck with glossy screen) is that I have a non-glossy external monitor that I use when at home.

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Snarkicist

I think Apple has set its sights on dominating the living room, but they're taking their time to get there. An Apple TV Set is most likely in the future, but I disagree with the idea of a 4TB RAID system. Everything will be stored at Apple's server farm in NC and streamed to your TV. (Of course, bandwidth pipes will have to be upgraded significantly in order to do that.)

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bruno

i used to agree with the notion that the flat screen tv market was already overcrowded for apple to enter, however looking at that prototype made me go, "hell i'd pay $1,000 over market rate for a 65" for an apple flatscreen tv. with all the internet / app enabled flatscreens coming out, apple tv, boxee and google logitech boxes aren't going to cut it against the net enabled flatscreens! so if apple wants any share of the living room they have to options:

1) license out an itunes app that runs on samsung, panasonic, lg, sony tvs
or
2) make a flatscreen similar to the prototype shown.

both options seem well "unapple" but 2010 apple inc. isn't going to give up on the living room... i think.

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sjobs

@teejaysplace
Physical media is dead. Has been. It's going no where. I'd hate to see it still being used years from now (in a consumer environment anyway). Price is not an issue for Apple. When the first iPhone came out, people were more than willing to pay for it because it was a revolutionary product. It was as if Apple had invented a pocket-size laptop. And you can't knock the AppleTV. There's a reason why they present the AppleTV as their "hobby". The market for lcd tvs may be over saturated but media centers have been up and coming just recently and no one has been able to get a complete, all-in-one media center package where everything "just works". If anyone can do that, it's Apple. I wouldn't doubt that for a second. You can argue from pretty much every angle there is, but there are people, like me, who would buy an Apple product without hesitation. Apple stock has taken care of me, why not return the favor.

@drmnez
The masses? Whom might you be talking about? To include your argument for the first generation iPhone, Apple has sold over 75 million iPhones (out-pacing RIM's Blackberry recently), a handful of 6.1 million "douche bags" bought the first generation iPhone in just over it's one year birthday. And like I said above, the iPhone was revolutionary and $600 for a product that would change the future is not much to ask. Some people may just lack the vision needed to see that though. Apple didn't sell the iPhone with a contract which easily raised the price. All phones cost a lot more than their contract price (duh). On top of that, the rest of your argument for the iPhone is pathetic. You're complaining about a first generation product. Shall we look at every first generation product ever made and criticize it as well? It's not where you are, it's where you're headed.

PS Kinect was offered to Apple first. Microsoft didn't make it, they bought the tech.

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drmnez

excellent point. when will steve jobs learn that he wont get to the masses unless he drops the price and makes apple product less proprietary. Do we all remember the first iphone? and it cost like $600? only a handful of douche bags paid for a product that did nothing. It wasn't until the device supported 3 party apps natively and that they offered "contract" pricing that people started buying the phone.
I hope if they try to compete with tv companies they realize they better be flexible with their BS or they wont even be players in the game that sony, lg, samsung, vizio, and several others have got under their belt.

PS i thought apple fans hate MS. so why is jobs integrating they type of tech from the Kinect? unless apple and their brown nosers are gonna act like its new tech that apple made.

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teejaysplace

If I see another post about an Apple-branded television, I might just throw up on my keyboard. It is, seemingly, always the top suggestion on every pundit's list of awesome "future" Apple products and probably the least likely to ever be made.

1.) The market for LCD screens is already over-saturated, making Apple a very expensive fish in a very big pond. (See: The Apple HiFi.) By the time this thing actually got around to production, it would need to compete, not only with TV's, but with the second or third generation of media hubs, like the Google TV and Boxee Box. Of course, Apple already has it's own version of these, which brings me to the next point...

2.) Apple has already tried two separate forays into our living rooms and, as of now, can't even get those products right. The original AppleTV was never a big seller and it's reincarnation is even more underwhelming, feature-wise. (A point that MacLife itself made in last month's issue.) Both times, consumers have asked for more, only to be sorely disappointed. Three years and two versions later, most of us are still clamoring for Blu-ray support...

3.) And we all know Apple's feelings on Blu-ray. They want to drive people to the iTunes store and optical discs simply don't help them do that. Any concept involving an Apple television would necessarily involve a revenue stream for the iTMS, leaving Blu-ray out in the cold again. I can't speak for everyone, but their is NO way I'm dropping $3,000 on an HD display that can't play my existing titles. Of course, I'm sure you could hook up your own Blu-ray player, but doesn't that make the whole concept a bit pointless?

4.) The people most interested in this product are, invariably, the ones who qualify their wish-mongering with the sentence "I'd buy one in an instant...of course, I buy everything Apple makes anyway." Before you go reaching for your future credit card, however, you might want to check out the future sticker price. The price on Apple's computer monitors has always been 2-3 times the market average for comparable products. Sure they look nice, but apply that math to a TV screen and you're talking about a $3,000 entry level, which is obscene giving how much the technology has fallen price-wise. Think that'll make Apple's version cheaper? Before it was discontinued this fall, the 30" Cinema Display was still $1700.

In the end, there are far more reasons not to make this device than to spend millions of dollars in R&D just to please the few fanboys that simply can't stand looking at a piece of tech with a different logo on it.

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