How to Cut Out Cable Once and For All

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allon

Foreign TV shows/stations normally unavailable in the US (and elsewhere) can often be accessed using a VPN service (Google "VPN Reviews" for lists of such services along with reviews"). Some of these TV stations have subtitle options during playback. Some even offer somewhat minimimized screen versions with a person doing sign language in the remaining area of the frame - the sign language used, however, will probably not be American Sign Language.

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MaclifeUK

UK
I did this years ago with Excel and my UK SKY TV programmes, worked out the cost per episode monthly, and whether I actually wanted to watch all the SKY only programmes.

32 episodes a week, cost per episode 16p.

£240 per annum

Updated Excel this year .....

I ditched SKY and bought Freeview (UK) PVR's, total cost £80 for four, on offer.

SKY was £21 pcm, so in four months I was quids in.

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chauncey007

We did it. My wife was not keen on the idea at first, but we found the majority of stuff we watch was just filler. We watch just as much TV as we did before, at less than half the cost, and our decisions on what to watch are now "intentional". $$ for Cable internet, and we stream Hulu. Also have a netflix (DVD's only) subscription, and our local channels (Digital Antenna) come in pretty well.

I'm 31, a guy, pretty techy, and just found out I'm in love with the Create channel and "Lidia's Itally in America". That woman is fantastic.

I doubt this article was written with ADA consdierations in mind - but it sounds like captioning is a significant issue for some. We don't use it, and found out that it was relatively easy to live with the change in programming.

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adahow

How does this get around MLB blackout restrictions for local games? In my market, Comcast has a death grip on the Phillies.

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Geoduck

We live in British Columbia but my wife follows the Twins. The MLB.com site and Apps (iOS and OS-X) apps seem to do everything she wants. Even when they are blacked out (Like when they are playing Toronto or Seattle) on TV she seems to be able to get what she wants. Sometimes it's radio rather than video but she catches nearly every game. I'm not an MLB fan so YMMV.

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allon

Try using a VPN service (Google "VPN reviews") and look for one with multiple US and/or canadianlocations to choose from. Then you will be able to watch blacked out games by using a VPN in a non-blacked out location.

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chirpity

You can cut out cable tv, but you can't cut out cable internet. So, really you can't cut out cable completely.

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iBookmaster

I could do that but, the biggest thing I would miss is live news from the 2 major news networks...CNN & Fox.

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Geoduck

CNN & Fox and News in the same sentence.
LOL

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jrcortez

My kids and I are not hearing impaired. However, we enjoy watching TV/movies with the captioning always on. We're not constantly saying, "What did he/she say?" It's there on the screen. Sometimes tho, the captioning is either too slow or too fast compared to the voice that's on.

J.R.

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Steve W. Jackson

I absolutely love having my TiVo because even with captions I often find that I can't quite discern what someone is saying. Making matters worse, modern TV producers often have music that simply overwhelms the dialog at times, making the captions more valuable.

But as someone who requires the captions, since I can't get even close to understanding most programming without them, I can surely sympathize with the issues surrounding them. Watching live programming is the most difficult, since even the best real-time captionists can't keep up entirely. And it never fails that some important graphic in a news or information program will be obscured by a poorly placed caption. It's also quite difficult to "watch" a program and get all the value of a visual medium when you're forced to "read the action" as I am.

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Steve W. Jackson

I've got a couple of significant issues with this idea.

First is the fact that there is not a single item on your list that I watch regularly. And much of what I do watch via my TiVo is reruns not likely available from the cited sources.

But the bigger issue is a complete lack of support for those of us with hearing impairments. Assume for a moment that I watched many/all of the programs you list. The network web sites do not caption those programs. I don't know about iTunes, but I suspect they don't either. I already know that Netflix only offers captioning on a small number of their titles, and then only on selected platforms. My TiVo is not one of those platforms, and I didn't purchase a 55-inch HDTV to watch any TV on my iPhone, iPad or MacBook Pro.

Netflix, Hulu and the rest will never get a single penny from me unless and until they offer captioning on all (or very nearly all) titles they offer. Period.

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