Life After Death

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Life After Death

Mini Parking Meter Change Box

Save money on tickets when you pack an easy-to-tote coin purse.

 

The iPod mini’s aluminum case makes a great shell for small objects, like our parking-meter change. While an iPod mini mint box seems like a fresh idea, we advise against putting anything edible inside—the solder and circuits that previously lived there might have left tiny amounts of contaminants that aren’t healthy to eat. Otherwise, fill up the mini box with buttons, high-end earbuds, or anything else.

 

Parts: iPod mini, ribbon
Tools: Hobby knife and/or guitar picks, dental pick (optional), tiny Phillips 000 screwdriver, ribbon, glue
Degree of difficulty: MEDIUM

 

 

 

You want to pry off just the plastic caps (top and bottom) first.

 

1. Pop the top.
Slide the switch to Hold, then pry off the plastic top and bottom caps. These are thin, slightly flexible parts held on only by glue. We’ve had the best luck carefully slipping a thin hobby knife or guitar pick between the plastic cap and the aluminum housing. Once in place, gently pry the cap back. Note that the caps are thin, and it’s easy to slip the knife or pick below that level and attempt to pry up the metal layer underneath—stay at a shallow depth to avoid this mistake.

 

 

 

Free the metal arms one at a time.

 

2. Remove the bottom plate.
The exposed metal plate on the bottom of the mini locks into place with its four curved arms. Those elbows fit into small recesses in the aluminum case. Use a dental pick or small nail in those parts’ holes, or gently push and pry each arm out of the slot. Work from the right side first, and avoid contacting the ribbon cable on the left side. Remove the plate. Gently lift the ribbon cable straight out of its socket with a dental pick or thin screwdriver shaft.

 

 

 

Once the teeny screws on the top end are gone, push the iPod guts right out the top.

 

3. Remove the insides.
Locate the two tiny Phillips screws at the top of the case (the headphone jack side). Remove them. Push the dock connector, sliding the screen and internal parts through the top of the case. Grab the sides of the circuit board and pull it the rest of the way out. Leave the clickwheel installed.

 

 

 

If you use ribbons for hinges, you won’t lose the top cap piece every time you want to open ’er up.

 

4. Reattach the ends.
Block the dock connector hole on the plastic cap. We covered it with a small ribbon glued into place. Then glue the cap back onto the bottom of the iPod. You may need to remove any remaining original glue from the part for the best fit.

At the top end of the case, glue two short ribbons to the inside of the aluminum and the plastic cap. These will become hinges. Give them a little slack, because the recessed design prevents the cap from opening fully if the ribbons are too tight. (Optionally, block the headphone-port hole with another ribbon.) Fill the iPod with parking meter change or any other small objects, and close the top.

 

Freelance tech journalist Zack Stern likes to apply Apple’s old “Rip, mix, burn,” mantra to the gadgets themselves. His interpretation is rarely literal.

 

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benet

Were not smart, but also learn from others bald.omega watchesChing had no water to fish, one to the cheap is invincible.replica watchI left Dragon, White Tiger right shoulder tattooed Mickey Mouse.replica watchesEfforts should be made! ! For your Audi Dior me.wen

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mixmagtmb

Wow this is a really second life, amazing aahh super i do that 100%.

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Anonymous

You can add iPod adapter to pretty much any car now. So now I'm using my 3rd gen 30 GB iPod solely in my car as a kind of musical server. Locked in a glovebox, no-one knows it there, it's filled to the brim and it's always there. Always ready and charged. Problem solved:-)

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Scott

These are cool, and dare I say cute mods. You oughta think about submitting them to Mac Mod (http://macmod.com/). When my 20GB completely dies I`ll have to do something like this. (It doesn`t ... won`t play music as an iPod, but I can still use it as a `source` in iTunes.

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Anonymous

Gaaah!

I have a neat idea for a glue gun and the genitalia of those responsible for this act of vandalism...

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Anonymous

Read thru it rather quickly so I may have missed it. I apologize in advance if I did. You didn't say what to do with the parts you took out, people will likely just throw them in the garbage.

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JM

I have a pretty high tolerance for iPod related stuff, but this is just a waste. I love Maclife...but why are you wasting a perfectly good 1st generation nano. There are many people who would love to get one of those. Some people have too much time and money to burn...I'm still going strong with my 3rd Gen Touch Wheel iPod... This article is pretty hard to stomach.

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Anonymous

A nice breath of fresh air to see/read something creative, rather than techno-centric. Something that requires a guitar pick, rather than a soldering iron. Bravo!

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Anonymous

Lol at your iPod tree.

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Anonymous

I found it quite interesting! Even though the chances of me making one is slim...it still sounds like fun!

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Frank

Seriously, worst Mac|Life article EVER. What a waste of space in the magazine.

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