Mac|Life - How-Tos http://www.maclife.com/articles/6/feed en Terminal 101: Change and View Date from Command Line http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_change_and_view_date_command_line <!--paging_filter--><p><em><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_102.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" />Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!</em><br /><br />Sometimes you may need to update the system time from the command line, particularly if you encounter issues booting into the OS X recovery partition if your Mac has been sitting for a while and the system date is incorrect. Fortunately, this is something that is easily changed in OS X using a bit of Terminal-ology, as you will see in this article. Continue reading, and we'll show you how to switch your system date to the correct date using a simple date command.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/date_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/date_1.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a><br /></p><h3>Viewing the Date</h3><p>To view the currently set system date, open the Terminal (located in /Applications/Utilities), and type the following command followed by the enter key:</p><pre>date</pre><p>Yep, that's all. The date will be outputted to the console for your viewing pleasure. This is the date that is set in the operating system and stored via battery backup when the computer is powered off.<br /></p><h3>Setting the Date</h3><p>Now, if you need to set the date on your system to the current correct date, you'll need to know the format that is required by the date command:</p><pre>date {month}{day}{hour}{minute}{year}</pre><p>You'll replace each of the brackets above with the a two-digit number that represents the month, day, hour, minute, and year in that order. Don't include spaces.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/date_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/date_2.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />For example, if you wanted to set the system date to April 12, 2014 12:10, you would enter the following command into the Terminal:</p><pre>date 0412121014</pre><p>When you press return, you can see that the date was set correctly by executing the date command to view the date.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_change_and_view_date_command_line#comments change Columns date Mac Mac Terminal Terminal 101 view How-Tos Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:28:54 +0000 Cory Bohon 19739 at http://www.maclife.com Terminal 101: Rebuild the Spotlight Index On the Fly http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_rebuild_spotlight_index_fly <!--paging_filter--><p><em><a href="http://www.maclife.com/tags/Terminal_101" target="_blank"><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_91.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></a>Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!<br /></em><br />Sometimes Spotlight doesn't behave properly, or perhaps doesn't know about files or folders that have just been created. Sometimes, it just forgets about files on external drives. When this happens, you can invoke a hidden feature (shown only through the Terminal commands) to cause your Spotlight Indexes to be rebuilt on either your Mac or any external drives connected to it. Let's walk through the process of how to do this.</p><h3>Rebuild Spotlight on your Mac</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/mdutil_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/mdutil_1.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>If you're having issues finding files on your Mac, then you can easily rebuild the Spotlight index for your Mac by typing the following command into the Terminal app (located in /Applications/Utilities):</p><pre>sudo mdutil -E /</pre><p>After pressing enter, you'll be required to enter your password (because this command runs as a super user). After you do that, you will notice after a few minutes that when clicking the Spotlight button in the menu bar, Spotlight will show that it is currently indexing your system.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/mdutil_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/mdutil_2.png" width="458" height="217" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />When Spotlight is indexing, it is building an extensive file that lets it quickly and easily search your system for just the item that you are looking for. This is why rebuilding the Spotlight index can fix a lot of issues stemming from wrong files showing in searches.</p><h3>Rebuild Spotlight on any drive</h3><p>Spotlight can build an index on each drive that is connected to the Mac for better searching on external drives. Fortunately, you can rebuild the Spotlight indexes on these drives as well. To do this, the the following command into the Terminal utility:</p><pre>sudo mdutil -E /Volumes/[DriveName]</pre><p>In the above command, you can either manually enter the drive name, or type in just the following portion of the command:</p><pre>sudo mdutil -E</pre><p>Then drag and drop a drive from the Finder on your Mac into the Terminal window. This will automatically enter the drive path and name for you. After pressing enter, you will once again be required to type in your account password. Again, Spotlight will begin building the index for the external drive within a few minutes of issuing this command.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a class="thickbox" href="http://twitter.com/coryb">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_rebuild_spotlight_index_fly#comments Columns index Mac Mac reindex searching spotlight Terminal Terminal 101 How-Tos Mon, 27 Jan 2014 22:59:17 +0000 Cory Bohon 19153 at http://www.maclife.com Terminal 101: Stress Test Your Mac With the Yes Command http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_stress_test_your_mac_yes_command <!--paging_filter--><p><em><a href="http://www.maclife.com/tags/Terminal_101" target="_blank"><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_89.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></a>Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!<br /></em><br />If you've ever had an issue with your Mac that only happened when the computer was under stress (or if you just have the sudden urge to give your Mac a stress test), then there's a Terminal command for you. Apple technicians often use the "yes" command to instantly begin utilizing 100 percent of your CPU and its cores. This is great for when you need to burn in or stress a Mac (or other Unix machine). Let's take a look at how to use it.</p><h3>Echoing y</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/yes_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/yes_1.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>By default, you can type the word "yes" into the command line, followed by enter to begin continually printing "y" to the standard out.</p><h3>Echoing another word</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/yes_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/yes_2.png" width="620" height="435" /></a></p><p>If you're running this test on a lot of machines, and get bored by the continual string of "y" running across the screen, then you can make things more exciting by denoting your own custom string to use. To do this, type the following command into the terminal:</p><pre>yes [word]</pre><p>Replace "[word]" with the word that you wish to echo to the command line.</p><h3>Stopping the command</h3><p>To stop the "yes" command from running, and relieve the strain on your Mac, you'll navigate back to the Terminal window and press the Control + C keyboard combo.</p><h3>Maxing all cores</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/yes_3.png"><img src="/files/u12635/yes_3.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>If you have a multi-core machine, then you enter the following command, followed by a space, the "&amp;" sign, and the exact same command to match the number of cores your machine has:</p><pre>yes &gt; /dev/null</pre><p>So, if you have two cores, use the following command:</p><pre>yes &gt; /dev/null &amp; yes &gt; /dev/null</pre><p>if you have three cores, this command:</p><pre>yes &gt; /dev/null &amp; yes &gt; /dev/null &amp; yes &gt; /dev/null</pre><p>and so on until you max out each core on your Mac.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/yes_4.png"><img src="/files/u12635/yes_4.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>To end this test and relieve the strain on your Mac, use the Control + C command, but then type the following command:</p><pre>killall yes</pre><p>This will ensure that all of the "yes" processes that were spawned on your computer are properly killed off and no longer continue to run. Using this method, the Terminal will not output any words to the screen.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_stress_test_your_mac_yes_command#comments Columns command cores CPU Mac Mac max stress stress-test Terminal Terminal 101 test yes How-Tos Mon, 13 Jan 2014 20:49:14 +0000 Cory Bohon 19042 at http://www.maclife.com Terminal 101: Changing the Screenshot Capture Location http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_changing_screenshot_capture_location <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://www.maclife.com/tags/Terminal_101" target="_blank"><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_86.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></a><em>Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!</em></p><p>Last week, we covered how to change the format of screenshots captured by the built-in OS X screen capture utility. This week, we want to tackle the way screenshots are saved, specifically taking a look at <em>where</em> they're saved. By default, OS X saves these screen captures to your Desktop on OS X. We'll take a look at how to change this location to something more appropriate using a simple Terminal command. Let's get started.</p><h3>Changing the Screenshot Capture Location</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/screenshot_1_0.png"><img src="/files/u12635/screenshot_1_0.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>To change the screenshot capture location to a new place on your Mac, first think of a location that would serve you properly. We like to place ours in a "Screenshot" folder located inside of the User's "Pictures" folder. To change the location to this new location, open the Terminal and enter the following command:</p><pre>defaults write com.apple.screencapture location /Users/[u]/Pictures/Screenshots/</pre><p>Replace "[u]" with the name of the user on your system. Once you have entered this command, let's restart the screen capture utility by restarting the SystemUIServer by entering the following command:</p><pre>killall SystemUIServer</pre><p>You can optionally log out and back in instead of entering this second command, thus restarting the SystemUIServer. Once restarted, all screen captures taken from here on out will end up in your /Pictures/Screenshots/ folder in the User's home folder on your Mac.</p><h3>Reverting the Capture Location back to the Desktop</h3><p>So, you're tired of the new screenshot location and want to change it back to the way it was? No problem! Simply enter the following command to revert the screenshots to appearing on the Desktop when captured again:</p><pre>defaults write com.apple.screencapture location /Users/[u]/Desktop/</pre><p>Replace "[u]" with the name of the user on your system. Next, log out and back in to make the change, or enter the following command to restart the SystemUIServer:</p><pre>killall SystemUIServer</pre><p>After doing that, all new screenshots will begin appearing on the Desktop once again. Note that when entering the location path, you must specify the path beginning from the root of your Mac's hard drive. Using the "~/" for specifying the user's home directory will not work. You can optionally drag and drop the folder into the Terminal window to enter the path automatically (this is a foolproof method). Also note that the location directory must have already been created, or else you will receive a permission warning from OS X.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_changing_screenshot_capture_location#comments capture Columns desktop location Mac Mac Photos pictures Screen Screenshot Terminal Terminal 101 Utility How-Tos Mon, 16 Dec 2013 22:59:32 +0000 Cory Bohon 18874 at http://www.maclife.com Terminal 101: Using Ditto to Copy Files http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_using_ditto_copy_files <!--paging_filter--><p><em><a href="http://www.maclife.com/tags/Terminal_101"><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_83.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></a>Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!</em></p><p>We've talked about the cp command in the past, which copies files between locations on your Mac. However, Apple has developed its own (better) implementation of cp. This command, called "ditto," not only copies the files from the source directory to the destination directory, creating the destination directory if it doesn't already exist; but will also merge the contents of the source directory with the destination directory if it does exist. Other niceties of this command are that it will follow symbolic links when copying files, and also preserve the file hard links modes and other metadata. Let's get started copying files with the ditto command.</p><p>Before we begin, let's first take a look at the basic syntax of the command:</p><pre>ditto sourceFolder destinationFolder</pre><p>As with other terminal commands, we type the command "ditto" first, then a space, followed by the source folder path (the source folder is the location you're copying from), then another space, followed by the destination folder path (the destination folder is the location you're copying to).<br /><br />So if we wanted to copy a folder and its included files and subdirectories, then we could issue a command like this:</p><pre>ditto ~/Documents/MyFolder ~/Desktop/MyNewFolder</pre><p>This would copy the contents of the MyFolder directory in the Documents folder to the "MyNewFolder" directory on the Desktop. Pretty straightforward, right?</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/ditto_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/ditto_1.png" width="620" height="299" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />After pressing enter, ditto does the rest, ensuring that the contents of the source folder are copied to the destination. If the destination folder doesn't exist, then it'll be created for you. If it does exist, then the contents will be merged into the destinatio folder, ensuring that nothing is overwritten accidentally.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/ditto_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/ditto_2.png" width="620" height="299" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />What if you want to see what the command is actually doing while it's running? Well, ditto has a verbose mode that spits out the current operation to the command line for your viewing pleasure. Let's take a look at how you can add this flag:</p><pre>ditto -V ~/Documents/MyFolder ~/Desktop/MyNewFolder</pre><p>As you can see here, we simply add the "-V" flag, and the command will begin printing out the current operation (one line at a time) to the terminal as each file is copied to the destination directory. This is great if you need to monitor the operation as it runs.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb/" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_using_ditto_copy_files#comments Columns copy cp destination ditto Interface Mac Mac move mv Source Sync Terminal Terminal 101 How-Tos Mon, 25 Nov 2013 20:50:50 +0000 Cory Bohon 18705 at http://www.maclife.com Terminal 101: Creating Cron Jobs http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_creating_cron_jobs <!--paging_filter--><p><em><a href="http://www.maclife.com/tags/Terminal_101"><img src="/files/u12635/terminal_101_teaser_82.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></a>Every Monday, we'll show you how to do something new and simple with Apple's built-in command line application. You don't need any fancy software, or a knowledge of coding to do any of these. All you need is a keyboard to type 'em out!</em></p><p><em></em>There are many times when you need to run a shell script or command at regular intervals. This can be to clean up your system or run maintenance tasks on your computer. For these jobs, you'll want to use something called "Crons." A cron job is a simple way of specifying a command and run interval to the operating system. We'll show you how to create these jobs, and how to remove them once they become unnecessary.</p><h3>The Cron Job Syntax</h3><p>When specifying the time at which a cron runs, there is a specialized syntax that is used to tell the operating system exactly when to run the task.<br /><br />The timing sequence of a cron job looks like this:</p><pre>* * * * *</pre><ul><li>The first asterisk is for specifying the minute of the run (0-59)</li><li>The second asterisk is for specifying the hour of the run (0-23)</li><li>The third asterisk is for specifying the day of the month for the run (1-31)</li><li>The fourth asterisk is for specifying the month of the run (1-12)</li><li>The fifth asterisk is for specifying the day of the week (where Sunday is equal to 0, up to Saturday is equal to 6)</li></ul><p>So, let's take a look at some examples:<br /><br />If you wanted to run the job every day at 1:00 p.m., then you could use the following cron job timing sequence:</p><pre>0 13 * * *</pre><p>If you wanted the job to run every 30 minutes, you could use the following sequence:</p><pre>30 * * * *</pre><p>And, lastly, if you wanted the job to run once a week on Wednesday, you could type the following sequence:</p><pre> * * * * 3</pre><p>If you have more intricate requirements for run times of cron jobs, then you can take a look at <a href="http://www.nncron.ru/help/EN/working/cron-format.htm" target="_blank">this guide for more detail on how to format the sequence</a>.<br /><br />Note that if you're not using a specific item, then you can replace it with an asterisk (*) and the cron will not include that in the timing sequence. Note that between the asterisks, there are tabs used, and not spaces (so, don't copy anything from here and paste), but type with tabs.</p><h3>Creating a Cron Job</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/cron_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/cron_1.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>Once you've got the sequence down, then actually creating the job is the easy part. We'll use nano to create a crontab entry that contains the timing sequence that you've figured out, as well as the command (or script location) that you wish to run.<br /><br />To begin creating the cron file, type the following command:</p><pre>env EDITOR=nano crontab -e</pre><p>This tells the "crontab" command to open a new file inside of the nano text editor. All of your cron jobs will be placed in this text file, each on a new line. Once the nano editor has loaded, you'll type in the cron jobs like this:</p><pre>[timing sequence] commandToRun</pre><p>Replace "[timing sequence]" with the cron job timing sequence that you've worked out in the first step. This will tell the crontab program when to run the command. Replace "commandToRun" with the actual command (or the path to a shell script) that you wish to run at the given time in the timing sequence.<br /><br />If you wish to enter multiple cron jobs, enter each cron on a separate line in the file.<br /><br />To save the file, press Control + O (to write out the file), then enter to accept the file name, then press Control + X (to exit nano).</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/cron_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/cron_2.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p><br />If all went well, then you should now have a cron job created for you. If the cron was properly created, then you should see "crontab: installing new crontab".<br /><br />Your command (or shell script) will then begin running at the scheduled timing sequence.</p><h3>Removing Cron Jobs</h3><p>There may come a time when you don't wish to run a cron job any longer. When that time comes, you can just edit the file by typing in the following command again:</p><pre>env EDITOR=nano crontab -e</pre><p>Delete the line that contains the command that you no longer wish to use, then re-save the file by pressing Control + O (to write out the file), then Control + X (to exit nano).</p><h3>List Scheduled Cron Jobs</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/cron_3.png"><img src="/files/u12635/cron_3.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>You can see how many jobs are currently scheduled from inside of cron by typing the following command:</p><pre>crontab -l</pre><p>This will list the currently scheduled jobs, one-by-one right inside of the Terminal without having to open the crontab file in the text editor.<br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/columns/terminal_101_creating_cron_jobs#comments Columns cron crontab Features Job Mac Mac reoccuring jobs reoccurring tasks scheduled scheduler schedules task Terminal Terminal 101 How-Tos Mon, 18 Nov 2013 22:05:07 +0000 Cory Bohon 18645 at http://www.maclife.com Mavericks How-To: Using Apple TV as a Second Display http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_using_apple_tv_second_display <!--paging_filter--><p><em>OS X Mavericks is finally here, so MacLife proudly presents a series of informative how-tos to keep you updated on what has changed and how to use it. Check back often to learn more about the newest Mac operating system from Apple.<br /></em><br />One of the more surprising (and nicer) changes Apple made to OS X with Mavericks was the ability to use any TV or display connected to an Apple TV as a second display for your Mac. All Macs that supported AirPlay mirroring in OS X Mountain Lion now have the ability to use AirPlay-connected TVs as a second display in Mavericks. In this article, we’ll show you how to turn this feature on and configure additional options, like changing where the audio comes from and the size of the secondary display.</p><h3>1. Enabling AirPlay Second Display</h3><p>To enable a second display over AirPlay, you first need to be connected to the same network as your Apple TV. Next, open System Preferences &gt; Displays, and select your Apple TV from the “AirPlay Display” drop-down menu.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/display_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/display_1.png" width="620" height="502" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />Once you do this, your display may flash as the second display connection is acquired, and the Apple TV takes over as the second display. If the displays are mirrored, then you can correct this by opening the “Arrangement” tab in System Preferences &gt; Displays, and ensuring that the “Mirror Displays” checkbox is unchecked. <br /><br />In this same “Arrangement” tab, you can move the displays around in the pane to ensure that they're positioned correctly, relative to your physical space (usually side-by-side, or top-down). The primary display here is denoted here by the Menu bar on the display. The arrangement helps with being able to drag windows from one display to the next: if your secondary display is arranged to be to the right of your primary one, for example, you can drag things to it through the right side of your primarcy screen.</p><h3>2. Changing the Audio Output</h3><p>By default, when you are connected to an AirPlay display, your system (and other) audio is automatically played through the AirPlay connection instead of locally. If you wish to change this, then open System Preferences &gt; Sound &gt; Output.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/display_3.png"><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/display_3.png" width="620" height="476" class="thickbox" /></a><br />Here, ensure that the selected output source is the one that you wish to play the audio through. While here, select the “Sound Effects” tab and ensure that “Selected Sound Output Device” is selected for the “Play sound effects through” option. This will ensure that all sound effects are always played through the device that is selected in the Output tab.</p><h3>3. Changing the Display Size</h3><p>Just like any other external display, you can change the resolution of the external AirPlay display by visiting System Preferences &gt; Displays.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/display_2.png"><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/display_2.png" width="620" height="417" class="thickbox" /></a><br />When you do this, each display will get a configuration window that appears. On the “Display” tab, you will be able to select the resolution that works best for you: “Best for display” will ensure that the highest possible resolution for the selected Apple TV will be used; or “Scaled” will let you choose the display size that works for you. <br /><br />The Scaled option will let you choose a resolution that works best for your device if the “Best for display” option isn't working to your liking. <br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_using_apple_tv_second_display#comments 10.7 10.8 10.9 airplay Apple TV Arrangement Audio displays Features How to Interface Mac Mac Mavericks OS X OS X 10.9 OS X Mavericks Primary resolution Second sound How-Tos Tue, 12 Nov 2013 21:43:23 +0000 Cory Bohon 18501 at http://www.maclife.com Mavericks How-to: Keep Your iCloud Keychain in Sync http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_keep_your_icloud_keychain_sync <!--paging_filter--><p><em><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_teaser.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" />OS X Mavericks is finally here, and MacLife will be bringing informative how to’s to keep you updated on what has changed and how to use it. Check back often to learn more about the newest operating system for the Mac from Apple.<br /></em><br />Mavericks and iCloud are changing the way people store their passwords and sync them across devices. For the average user who doesn’t implement <a href="http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/how_manage_passwords_1password" target="_self">1Password</a> or <a href="http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/how_manage_your_passwords_lastpass" target="_blank">LastPass</a> into their workflow, and doesn’t need the advanced features that come with those software packages, iCloud Keychain is the perfect companion. With iCloud Keychain, usernames saved on one machine will be available on other Macs and iOS devices with the service turned on. Continue reading, and we’ll show you how to turn this feature on, and how to use it on both Macs and iOS devices alike.</p><h3>What is Keychain and iCloud Keychain?</h3><p>Keychain is OS X’s built-in password manager, and (among other things) it keeps your passwords safe and secure for built-in applications, including Safari on both OS X and iOS. iCloud Keychain is a new feature of iCloud that enables your local Keychain on your Mac and iOS devices to be synced through iCloud to all of your devices. In a nutshell, this means that a password saved on your Mac will be available to your iOS devices, and vice versa.</p><h3>Enabling iCloud Keychain</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/keychain_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_1.png" width="620" height="463" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>Enabling iCloud Keychain is a breeze. On your Mac, visit System Preferences &gt; iCloud, and check the box labeled “Keychain.”</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/keychain_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_2.png" width="620" height="463" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />If this is your first time setting up iCloud Keychain, you will be required to enter your iCloud password and verify your account information. If this is the second device you’ve set up iCloud Keychain on, you'll be asked to verify your machine by sending an approval request to one of your other Mac or iOS devices. Once this approval has been granted, then the machine requesting approval will be able to sync its keychain.</p><h3>Filling Passwords on the Mac</h3><p>On the Mac, open Safari, and ensure that the browser can fill in passwords. To do this, open Safari &gt; Preferences (or press Command + comma) &gt; AutoFill, and check the box for “Usernames and Passwords.”</p><p><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/keychain_3.png" width="596" height="144" /><br /><br />After this box has been checked, then you can add passwords by first attempting to log into a website. Safari will now ask if you wish to save the password or not. If you choose to “Save,” then the password will be saved in your local OS X Keychain, and then subsequently synced to iCloud through the iCloud Keychain sync. When you revisit the site, you will automatically have your username and password entered into the field(s) for you. No worrying about typing them in manually any longer.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/keychain_4.png"><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/keychain_4.png" width="620" height="477" class="thickbox" /></a><br />You can look at the usernames and passwords that Safari manages for you visiting Safari &gt; Preferences &gt; Passwords. You can remove any passwords you no longer need Safari to manage in this section.</p><h3>Filling Passwords on iOS devices</h3><p>In order to use your iCloud Keychain on your iOS devices, you’ll first need to turn on iCloud Keychain syncing in iOS. To do this, visit Settings &gt; iCloud &gt; Keychain, and flip the switch to ON for the iCloud Keychain.</p><p><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_5-1.png" width="300" height="214" /><br /><br />You’ll be required to go through the same approval process as on the Mac side of things, or enter your approval code manually. The approval code is the code that was created when you first set up iCloud Keychain.</p><p><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_6.png" width="300" height="304" /><br /><br />To begin using your iCloud Keychain passwords, simply visit a site that stores your password in iCloud Keychain. When you tap into the field to enter your username and password, a the keyboard toolbar will now feature a button labeled “AutoFill Password.” Tapping this button will cause your username and password to automatically be filled in for you. If the username and password does not yet exist in your iCloud Keychain, then you’ll be prompted to add it when submitting the login form.</p><p><img src="/files/u12635/keychain_7.png" width="300" height="532" /><br /><br />You can tweak what automatically gets filled in by opening Settings &gt; Safari &gt; Passwords &amp; AutoFill. Here, you can choose what contact information can be used to AutoFill, as well as the ability to AutoFill names, passwords, and credit cards. <br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_self">Follow this article's author on Twitter.</a></em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_keep_your_icloud_keychain_sync#comments 10.8 1Password iCloud iCloud Keychain LastPass Mac Mac Mavericks OS X OS X 10.9 OS X Mavericks password sync How-Tos Mon, 04 Nov 2013 22:22:41 +0000 Cory Bohon 18431 at http://www.maclife.com Top 6 Mavericks Annoyances and How To Fix Them http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/top_6_mavericks_annoyances_and_how_fix_them <!--paging_filter--><p><em><em><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/mavericks_teaser.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></em>OS X Mavericks is finally here, so MacLife proudly presents a series of informative how-tos to keep you updated on what has changed and how to use it. Check back often to learn more about the newest Mac operating system from Apple.<br /></em><br />Many users have upgraded to Mavericks from Mountain Lion with the best of intentions, but if your workflow revolved around some of the things that changed with Mavericks, then you may be less than excited about the new features. Some of these, including full-screen apps, each display getting its own Space, and the Dock and menu bar available on multiple displays, can be tweaked back to the way they behaved in Mountain Lion. We'll show you how.</p><h3>1. Fixing Multiple Menubars and Spaces</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tip_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tip_1.png" width="620" height="528" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>One of the biggest potential annoyances with Mavericks and a second connected display is that the OS X Menubar is available on all displays, and not just the primary one. Fortunately, Apple has included a way to turn this off, and it fixes a second annoyance. <br /><br />To do this, visit System Preferences &gt; Mission Control, and uncheck the box labeled “Displays have separate Spaces.” You may be required to log out after making this change. <br /><br />So, what does this change do? Well, besides the obvious change of making each display share the Spaces instead of giving each display its own set of Spaces, this will also remove the Menubar from all displays except for the primary one. You can always change this preference back to its original settings by checking this box again.</p><h3>2. The Dashboard</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tip_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tip_2.png" width="620" height="435" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p>The Dashboard seems to keep hanging on after more than five OS X iterations. While we’re sure it still gets used by many people, there are a few (ourselves included) who are getting tired of Dashboard wasting precious keyboard real estate. Here’s how to nix it from your system:<br /><br />Open the Terminal and type this command, followed by the enter key:</p><pre>defaults write com.apple.dashboard mcx-disabled -boolean true</pre><p>Follow that up with this command followed by the enter key:</p><pre>killall Dock</pre><p>The deed is now done, and the Dashboard will be disabled. You can get it back by reversing the command’s true statement with a false, then killing the Dock again:</p><pre>defaults write com.apple.dashboard mcx-disabled -boolean false</pre><h3>3. Turn off App Nap</h3><p><img src="/files/u12635/tip_3.png" width="335" height="220" /></p><p>App Nap is a brand-new feature of Mavericks that reduces resources for apps in the background, in hopes that they will reduce power consumption. However, some apps may behave poorly with this new feature. If you notice erratic behavior from your backgrounded apps, you can turn off App Nap on a per-app basis by opening the Get Info panel for an app in your Applications folder. Here, uncheck the box labeled “Prevent App Nap.”</p><h3>4. Turn off Away Notifications</h3><p>Notifications in Mavericks now appear on your lock screen to show you items that happened while you were away. This new feature can be annoying, especially when you open your MacBook in a meeting, only to see multiple Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus notifications appear on your screen.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tip_4.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tip_4.png" width="620" height="522" class="thickbox" /></a><br /><br />Fortunately, you can correct this by opening System Preferences &gt; Notifications. Here, select an app that supports notifications, and then uncheck the box labeled “Show notifications on lock screen.”</p><h3>5. Quickly Turn Off Notifications</h3><p><img src="http://www.maclife.com/files/u12635/tip_5.png" width="313" height="125" /></p><p>Notifications are great, but sometimes they can really be annoying. Fortunately, there’s an easy way to ensure that you get no notifications for the entire day. All you have to do is hold down the Option key on your keyboard while you click the Notification Center icon in your Menubar. Optionally, you can open the Notification Center by clicking on the icon in the Menubar and sliding the “Do Not Disturb” switch to “ON.”</p><h3>6. The Dock on Multiple Displays</h3><p>In Mavericks, the Dock can automatically appear on a secondary display if you drag your mouse to the bottom of the screen on the secondary monitor (this will cause the Dock to switch displays from the primary display).</p><p><img src="/files/u12635/tip_6.png" width="607" height="373" /><br /><br />Unfortunately, this can get annoying if you’re not used to this behavior. A simple fix is to move your Dock on the primary display to one of the sides (left or right). When the Dock is positioned on the side of the screen, it will not jump between displays. You can change the positioning of the Dock in System Preferences &gt; Dock. <br /><br /><em>Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. <a href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/top_6_mavericks_annoyances_and_how_fix_them#comments 10.8 10.9 Annoyance App Nap Dashboard display Do Not Disturb dock fix Mac Mac Mac OS X menubar Mountain Lion Multiple Spaces notifications OS X OS X Mavericks Screen Spaces How-Tos Mon, 28 Oct 2013 20:39:00 +0000 Cory Bohon 18432 at http://www.maclife.com Mavericks How-To: Organizing Files and Folders with Tags http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_organizing_files_and_folders_tags <!--paging_filter--><p><em><img src="/files/u12635/tagged_teaser.png" width="150" height="150" class="graphic-right" /></em></p><p><em>OS X Mavericks is finally here, so MacLife proudly presents a series of informative how-tos to keep you updated on what has changed and how to use it. Check back often to learn more about the newest Mac operating system from Apple.</em></p><p><em></em>One of the main features of OS X Mavericks is the long-awaited tagging abilities built right into the operating system. Tags are available in all system-owned Save panels, in the iCloud file browser, and of course in Finder as well. From viewing, to searching, to sorting, tags make all of these tasks easier. Continue reading, and we’ll show you how to define tag meaning, tag items, and view those tagged files with ease in Mavericks.</p><h3><span style="font-size: 1.17em;">Defining Tag Meaning</span></h3><p><span style="font-size: 1.17em;"></span><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_1.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_1.png" width="469" height="635" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_1.png"></a>Tags in Mavericks reuse the methodology of colored tags in previous generations of OS X. You can manage all of your existing tags, and assign or rename them in Finder &gt; Preferences (or press Command + comma) &gt; Tags.</p><p>Here, all of your tags will be visible. Right-click on any tag to delete it. Deleting a tag will simply remove that tag from a file, and will not remove the actual file. Click on any of the tag titles to rename the tag to a more appropriate meaning. Here, you can also drag any of your most-used tags to the bottom portion of the view. This will automatically add them to the list that appears when right-clicking a file in the Finder, for easier tagging.</p><h3><span style="font-size: 1.17em;">Tagging Files in the Finder</span></h3><p><span style="font-size: 1.17em;"></span><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_2.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_2.png" width="266" height="241" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_2.png"></a>Tagging files in the Finder is just as easy as managing your Tags. Right-click on any file in the Finder, and select one of your favorite tags from the tags listing. If you want to create a new tag, then click the "Tags" item, and a popover dialog will appear, letting you specify the name of the new tag.</p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tags_3.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_3.png" width="620" height="404" class="thickbox" /></a></p><h3>Tagging in a Save Dialog</h3><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tags_4.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_4.png" width="620" height="555" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u12635/tags_4.png"></a>Tagging can also be done through the Save dialog in almost any application that uses the standard OS X save dialog. When saving a file, you’ll see the new Tag field that lets you specify the name of the tag. As you start typing, your existing tags will be filtered, and you can select any of them from the autocompletion to have the document tagged with that tag.</p><h3><span style="font-size: 1.17em;">Searching with Tags</span></h3><p><span style="font-size: 1.17em;"></span><a class="thickbox" style="text-align: center;" href="/files/u12635/tags_5.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_5.png" width="620" height="404" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Tags makes searching a breeze in Spotlight</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;"><strong></strong>To do this in Spotlight, enter a search term for the item that you’re looking for, then type "tag:tagname," replacing "tagname" with the tag you wish to filter using. For example, if we were looking for a file named "myfile" tagged with the "mytag" tag, you’d type the following into Spotlight:</p><p style="text-align: left;">myfile tag:mytag</p><p style="text-align: left;">Spotlight would then search through all of the files tagged "mytag" with the search term "myfile."</p><h3><span style="font-size: 1.17em;">Viewing Tags in Finder</span></h3><p><span style="font-size: 1.17em;"></span><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_6.png"><img src="/files/u12635/tags_6.png" width="620" height="404" class="thickbox" /></a></p><p><a class="thickbox" style="font-size: 10px;" href="/files/u12635/tags_6.png"></a>There are a few ways to display all tagged files for a specific tag within the Finder. We’ll show you two: Through search, and through the Sidebar.</p><p>Through the Search bar, type in the name of that tag what you wish to view the files for, then select the tag that appears in the autocompletion drop down. All files for that specific that will be shown in the search results.</p><p>You can also view your most recent tags from the Finder sidebar by first enabling this feature by going to Finder &gt; Preferences &gt; Sidebar, and checking the box labeled, "Recent Tags." Most recent tags will appear in the Finder sidebar, and selecting one of them will display all of the files associated with that tag.&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-style: italic;">Cory Bohon is a freelance technology writer, indie Mac and iOS developer, and amateur photographer. </span><a style="font-style: italic;" href="http://twitter.com/coryb" target="_blank">Follow this article's author on Twitter</a><span style="font-style: italic;">.</span></p> http://www.maclife.com/article/howtos/mavericks_howto_organizing_files_and_folders_tags#comments 10.8 10.9 Features Files find finder Mac Mac Macintosh Mavericks Mountain Lion organize OS X OS X Mavericks Sort tagging Tags How-Tos Fri, 25 Oct 2013 22:50:04 +0000 Cory Bohon 18411 at http://www.maclife.com