Features

Susie Ochs's picture

 When Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone in his January 9, 2007, keynote address, he called it “a widescreen iPod, mobile phone, and Internet communicator.” And it was. Later in the speech, he explained that it ran a version of Mac OS X, designed for “desktop-class applications.” And it did—but the iPhone only used the applications that Apple chose to build into its firmware. Developers could only write apps to run in the Web browser, or be installed on hacked, or jailbroken, iPhones.

Anonymous's picture

  The iPod is not only the best-looking and best-selling music player to date but also a springboard from which dozens of accessories have launched and soared. These products turn your iPod from a mere digital music player into multi-functional tool--that happens to play episodes of Family Guy.  Some attachments are so useful that it makes you wonder why Apple didn’t think of it first. In fact, some of these accessories can become so integral to your iPod that it can feel naked without them.

Roberto Baldwin's picture

 Dennis Liu, creator of our favorite screencast music video, "Again and Again" from the indie band, The Bird and the Bee, took us through the process of creating the spellbinding video. 

Roberto Baldwin's picture

The Revolution Will Be YouTubed

 You’ve finished your cinematic masterpiece and now you have to tackle the biggest problem facing filmmakers today: How do you distribute your video to the plethora of available outlets: DVDs, iPods, iPhones, the Internet, and God forbid, Zunes. Considering the number of codecs and video formats out there, getting your brain wrapped around all of them can be an exercise in futility. Don’t fret, future Antonioni, we’re here to weed out all the excess and you give you the information you need to get your film seen now without the need for a degree in video engineering.

Anonymous's picture

10 Things We Miss From OS 9

 For millions of post-iPod Mac users, OS X is the alpha and omega of the Apple desktop. Unlike Microsoft --- which has basically kept the same arrangement and appearance for its task bar and icons despite updating the overall feel of Windows over the last decade or so --- Apple took its OS in a completely new direction back in 2001 and has never looked back, integrating a new processor architecture and building a revolutionary mobile platform around its sleek engine and slick curves.

Anonymous's picture

Canadian Rebate Ideas

 Things are looking up for Canadian Apple users. Not only did the Great White North finally get official confirmation from Rogers that the company will soon carry the iPhone, but Apple Canada is offering a $45 credit to owners of older iPods who’ve run into battery problems. Anyone with a first, second or third generation iPod purchased before June 24, 2004 is eligible for the rebate, thanks to two different lawsuits filed in Montreal and Toronto claiming Apple had misrepresented the iPod’s battery life. But what will Canadians do with this newfound wealth? Apple hopes they’ll put it towards a new iPod, but here’s a few alternatives for making the most of this unexpected windfall.

Get the highest possible dynamic range out of your image. Ever wonder why even the best photographs can’t compare to the real thing? The human eye has the remarkable ability to adjust light sensitivity on the fly. Cameras, however, can only record a scene using a single exposure. In a scene with high contrast (that is, lots of dark and bright areas), both highlight and shadow details are going to get lost. So suppose you could take several pictures at varying exposures and blend the exposures together? That could make for a very impressive image.

Anonymous's picture

The Upcoming 4G Battle

 iPhone users should have more than Steve Jobs' keynote address on June 9 to speculate about. It may be too soon to tell, but it looks as if wireless technology may be gearing for a standards war akin to the throw-down between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD. There's an urgent need for fast, widespread Internet access -- gods know we need our YouTube videos as fast as we can get them. Currently, the iPhone has a data transfer speed of a mere 60 KB/s to 170 KB/s on its EDGE network and a slightly more respectable 150 KB/s to 6000 KB/s through Wi-Fi. The fourth generation (4G) of wireless tech is expected to serve up data at a scorching 100 Mbit/s to 1 Gbit/s.

Roberto Baldwin's picture

 With all the hoopla surrounding the Apple TV, many Mac owners are unaware that an easy device for streaming iTunes media may already be sitting in their entertainment system. All three of the latest game consoles—PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Nintendo Wii—are capable of streaming media from your Mac to your television over your existing network. 

 There are secrets. Secrets you are not supposed to know about. Suppressed 200mpg automobile engines. Faster-than-light-speed travel technology we scavenged at Roswell. The location of Walt Disney’s cryogenically frozen body. The truth about the Masons. But none of these inspires as much discussion and theorizing as the one to which we turn our attention here: Apple’s next big product.  We unlocked the vault and scoured the USPTO’s database for a hint at what Steve’s next “one more thing” keynote reveal might be. Overall, we sifted through nearly 2,000 Apple patents, spanning 30 years of innovation. The paper cuts and bloodshot eyes paid off through a collection of the coolest, wildest, and weirdest inventions that Apple has ever come up with. Join us as we reveal the most tantalizing and, frankly, mind-boggling patents from the inner sanctum of Apple’s R&D lab, three of which we’ve taken from crude line drawing into the world of 3D mock-up, with our own photo-realistic designs.