iPod

From the tiny shuffle to the awesome iPod touch, we've got them all covered.

iPod

Boston Innovative IMEP MP-702-388

The screen’s nice, but you can’t play your brand-new iPod’s video on it.  The iMep MP-702-388 looks like a portable TV, and it is, but it’s also a boom box with an AM/FM radio, a DVD video player, a CD player, and an iPod speaker. The radio works well, and there’s a collapsible antenna to help with reception. We didn’t have much luck with the TV, even when we attached a TV antenna, but you if you have cable, just connect it to the iMep. DVD movies looked good onscreen, and you can use the included remote control to navigate through the DVD menus. 

Anonymous's picture

Pole Position Remix

 Pole Position initially seems like a good fit for an iPod remake; this racer adapts the arcade steering wheel to the click wheel. But think back to the difficulty of the original. Unless you were that one savant who could keep racing, you probably dropped quarters into the classic, only to crash into enemy cars, run out of time, and burn through all of your snack money. While not a literal copy of the original, the iPod version captures this frustration perfectly.

Anonymous's picture

Block Breaker Deluxe

 Welcome to the neon-and-sharkskin world of underground, professional block breaking. Yes, we’d never heard of this high-stakes, live-fast, die-young society until booting up an iPod game of Block Breaker Deluxe. And this mediocre slobs-versus-snobs setup -- guess which one you play -- is about as engaging as the actual Breakout-style game. 

Anonymous's picture

Life After Death

Most iPods are shaped like tombstones. Coincidence? We’ve buried our share, but the strong music-playing interface keeps us buying more. When an iPod is finally ready for that great silhouetted commercial in the sky, recycle it to fill a new purpose. It’ll be much more useful than a taxidermied pet, yet still remind you of the good times.Reincarnate old and broken iPods with these fun projects.

Anonymous's picture

Shuffle Your iPod’s Look

iPods look good, but they all look alike. Make your working iPod stand out with a new metal backing. Just permanently cover the original stainless steel by electroplating a new layer on top. Choose from gold, copper, nickel, tin, chrome, bronze, or other finishes. We tried gold- and copper-plating kits from Caswell Plating, for flashy and retro results. Be warned that gold can be difficult to apply, while copper is comparatively easy. We’ll explain the process for either metal. 

Anonymous's picture

iPod Game Goodness

  The iPod game catalog has evolved from an eye-rolling list of classic videogame clones to a wide array of options. I played the latest batch over a sailing vacation, testing them on my iPod Video during lazy tacks. While nostalgic cash-in games make appearances—Sonic and Bomberman—I found a new favorite iPod game.

Equinux CoverScout

CoverScout can search Amazon’s music library for covers, but it doesn’t match the song with the correct album.

 

iTunes’ ability to display album artwork adds a visual element to your music collection, but its ability to actually get that artwork doesn’t always work. CoverScout can help fill those holes in your music collection, if you can work around some of its shortcomings.

iPod Solo

Just because you plugged in your iPod doesn't mean you want iTunes.

iPod Games

 Apple introduced iPod games about a year ago, and fortunately, the collection wasn’t left to flounder. Apple has added a few new titles, which is proof of Apple’s commitment to iPod games - a big deal to longtime Mac folks who are familiar with Apple’s less-than-stellar gaming history. All of these games are $4.99 (except the 99-cent iQuiz) through the iTunes Store, and you need a fifth-gen video iPod or a new iPod classic to play them. (Sudoku also works with the new third-gen iPod nano.) 

Anonymous's picture

Enter Your Game Phase

Fanciful graphics include undersea settings, alien worlds, and metropolitan cityscapes. It’s no coincidence that Phase was created by Harmonix, also the designer of mega-hit, Guitar Hero III. Similar to that game, Phase asks players to tap buttons in time to visual cues and songs’ rhythms. But instead of being locked into a preset list of tunes, Phase works with nearly any iPod song. This simple music game is catchier than the hook on a top-40 hit.