Nike + iPod Sport Kit

Small, light, and highly encouraging. Nike and Apple have teamed up to provide a powerful motivational tool for both seasoned athletes and casual runners: the Nike + iPod Sport Kit. Along with its companion Web site, www.nike.com/nikeplus, the Sport Kit will track your runs, help you set and meet goals, and even partner you with others in group challenges.

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iPod nano

As inspiration for the new iPod nano, Apple looked to an iPod of the past - the iPod mini. With its brightly colored aluminum casing, the second-generation iPod nano looks like a mini iPod mini, available in silver (2GB or 4GB); pink, green, and blue (4GB); and black (8GB). The new case is a vast improvement over the first-gen nano's easily scratched veneer. We carried it around in a bag for a week - crashing up against keys, coins, a camera, and other potential finish-wreckers - and it didn't pick up a single mark. Svelte at 3.5 by 1.6 by 0.26 inches and 1.41 ounces, it's even slimmer and lighter than the first iPod nano, and sturdy enough to survive being sat on by a 280-pound reviews editor when it was in his back pocket.

iPod (5.5G)

Both its software and its screen are brighter. Although it wasn't "completely remastered," as was the iPod nano, the flagship 5G iPod received a sprucing up in its latest incarnation. It shares the same software upgrades as the iPod nano, and its larger screen and larger capacity make the interface's search improvements more welcome than on the nano. Also on the software side is the addition of games (reviewed on p66), which can run on older 5G video-capable iPods, too.

iWoofer

This pint-sized cutie has impressive sound but disappointing FM performance. Complete with legs, eyes, and a mouth, the iWoofer will brighten your day with its cheerful, animal-like visage. It features two small front speakers and a woofer on its cute little bottom, encircled by four blue LEDs that light up when powered via AC or 4 AA batteries - the lights can be toggled by a button on the iWoofer's side. Three sound sources are supported: your iPod, a built-in FM radio, or an auxiliary input. With a set of supplied holders, the iWoofer handles and charges (over AC or USB) any iPod from the second generation forward except the nano - a separate iWoofer nano is also available.

mTune-N

Was your iPod nano meant to be seen and heard? That's your call. Macally's mTune-N headphones have a slot for your iPod nano, so instead of hiding in your pocket, it's out and about for everyone to see - on your head. Accessing the nano's controls is a little tricky if you decide to leave the mTune-N on. The headphones have a 3.5-millimeter jack, so you can connect a male-to-male cable (included) between the headphones and the headphone jack of an iPod or Mac.

TransPod

The TransPod is the iPod car adapter we've been looking for all our lives. Well, at least since late 2001. The TransPod might be the perfect iPod car adapter. It's well constructed, uses any FM frequency, allows FM presets, is compatible with any dockable iPod, and charges your 'Pod battery. Plus, the signal it transmits to your car radio is solid - we were able to use more than a dozen FM frequencies, all with excellent clarity.

JBL On Time

Here's an artsy - and fine-sounding - alarm clock. The iPod is no ordinary digital music player, so it's fitting that the JBL On Time looks far from ordinary. This alarm clock can play music from your iPod, and it looks good on your nightstand - assuming you've filled your room with modern Scandinavian furniture. If you're more of a traditional, Thomasville-type person, then the On Time (available in white or black) may clash with your style

iPod Hi-Fi

The Hi-Fi looks cool without its black-mesh covering.  If you want a good-sounding iPod speaker system, you can spend as little as $149.99 for the Logitech mm50 (www.logitech.com) or as much as $399.99 for the Klipsch iFi (www.klipsch.com). The iPod Hi-Fi nestles into the upper end of that range at $349. Its sound quality goes a long way toward justifying its price tag, but we can't help wishing for more from the company that invented the iPod itself.

iPod Radio Remote

FM, fine - but forget about ball games. The tiny iPod Radio Remote adds FM reception to your iPod nano or video-capable iPod. Bundled with standard earbuds attached to a shorter cable, the remote clips to your shirt, pocket, or whatever. When you plug the remote into your iPod's docking port, a Radio item appears in the 'Pod's main menu; select it, and the FM-tuning screen appears. It's a snap to select stations using the Click Wheel or mark favorite stations and jump to them with the forward and back buttons on either the iPod or the remote (which can also be used to control your iPod). Unfortunately, although reception is excellent when tuned to strong stations, weaker stations drift in and out.

FS1 High Definition Earphones

Quality earphones are pricey, but they sound oh so good. It's easy to get a snug fit with XtremeMac's FS1 High Definition Earphones, as they come with three different earpieces: cone-shaped silicone sleeves, foam sleeves that feel a lot like foam earplugs, and flanged tips. That tight fit helps block outside noise so you can better enjoy the FS1's great sound quality.