LightSnake Microphone-to-USB Cable

The LightSnake takes the frustration out of XLR mic connectivity. Podcasters hoping to record pro-level audio usually have to dish out pro-level dollars - a good XLR microphone requires an interface box to connect to your Mac, and that'll set you back at least $200. But with the LightSnake Microphone-to-USB Cable, you can spend a fraction of that and still be able to connect XLR mics directly to your Mac.

Fire Flash

This FireWire-based flash drive is a teeny speed demon.

Anonymous's picture

8GB USB flash drive survives dunking in water, drop-kicks onto concrete, and attempted crushing by 250-pound editor.

Apple TV

Enjoy your iTunes music, TV shows, movies, and more from the comforts of your couch.

ColorVantage Inks

These inks provide great results - but you'll have to work for it.

NuPower Video+

Give your iPod a battery boost. Three thousand, nine hundred and eighty. That’s the number of times we played Guided by Voices’ 1-minute song “The Perfect Life” consecutively on a fully charged 7-month-old 80GB 5G iPod at its default settings with a NuPower Video+ iPod battery pack attached. (The song is actually 59 seconds, so we added 1 second of silence to make it a little easier to calculate the NuPower’s, uh, power.) That many minutes add up to 66.33 hours—compared to the 19 hours you can get from just your iPod’s battery. Using it for video playback, we got 22.17 consecutive hours. We also tested it while playing music on shuffle, and got similar results. Oddly, Newer Technology claims you’ll get 80 hours of audio (which we fell short on) and only 16 hours of video. Regardless, that’s a whole lot of iPod-ing going on.

Stylus Photo 1400

You don't have to go to a lab to get top-quality prints.

PowerShot G7

It won't replace your SLR, but it's almost as capable and much more portable.

Hardsleeve

Beautiful and tough - what else do you need from a 'Book case?

Tango

Decent looks, decent sound, decent connectivity - but, unfortunately, "decent" doesn't mean "great." With a name like Tango, you might expect dramatic, luscious sound quality from this iPod speaker. What we got from the Tango, however, was a mixed bag of audio results. The Tango has a pair of 2.5-inch midrange speakers, two 1-inch tweeters, and a 4-inch woofer at the bottom of the unit that faces down toward the surface that the speaker sits on. As you'd expect from a speaker with a sizable woofer, the bass from the Tango booms—but with cringe-inducing distortion, even after we turned down the bass. On rock tracks where the bass wasn't as prominent, the Tango did a decent job with midrange sounds, but opera songs lacked clarity.