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Susie Ochs's picture

Boo to all blister packs everywhere! I cut myself a tiny bit prying this one open, and I was using scissors and everything...

3Dconnexion SpaceNavigator: First Look

This lil' knob makes it easier to move through Google Earth and other 3D apps.

iLuv i199 and XtremeMac Luna

 The iPod has become more than just a music player: With systems such as iLuv's i199 and XtremeMac's Luna, the iPod becomes the heart of home entertainment. And the i199 and Luna both let you get the most from your iPod.  

Anonymous's picture

Protect your MacBook or MacBook Pro - and assert your personal style - with one of three padded notebook sleeves from Built, Case Logic, and be.ez.

MultiSync LCD2470WNX

This gorgeous 24-inch display is a widescreen wonder.

PowerShot SD900

This 10-megapixel point-and-shoot camera is compact but compromised.

Officejet Pro L7680

This all-in-one office printer can be your new executive assistant.

The Podcasting Pak includes a good-looking USB-powered microphone, a mini mic stand, and a foam-lined industrial-strength case to carry it all. Every podcast recording begins with a microphone. The only reason that most Mac users haven't worried too much about the mic is because the built-in mics on iMacs, MacBooks, and MacBook Pros have worked just fine for most off-board uses. If you tried to record on a Mac notebook, however, you've no doubt noticed a few irksome issues: fan noise, primarily (unless you're recording MIDI, in which case no harm, no foul). While it's fully possible to make this flaw seem like a feature by packaging your podcast as some sort of staged neoindustrial set piece complete with whirring machinery in the background, in actual fact, fan noise is not a desirable trait. Moreover, if what you're doing involves live music, instruments, or any other nuanced acoustic audio source, using the built-in mic is less than ideal.

These drives from Seagate, Iomega, and Western Digital will bulk up your storage capabilities.

Variax Workbench 1.5

The mad ax lab: Variax Workbench lets you concoct any flavor of guitar from scratch. Line 6 has made a name for itself creating simulations of a wide range of guitar amplifiers and stompbox effects. When used with an amazing Variax guitar, the Variax Workbench software and dedicated USB interface lets you play Dr. Frankenax, mixing and matching the pickups from a Fender Stratocaster with the body of a Gibson Firebird, in dropped D tuning with a capo. It's beyond good - divine is much more appropriate.