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Intaglio 2.9.4

This easy-to-use drawing tool is equally easy to learn.

iListen 1.7

Stenography may be a dying art - but not on your Mac.

iDefrag 1.6.1

Straighten out your hard drive for better performance.

Fluid Mask 2.0

This plug-in fixes one of Photoshop's few weak points: masking.

Stylus Photo 1400

You don't have to go to a lab to get top-quality prints.

EazyDraw 2.1.3

Although this drawing tool is a pleasure to use, it's far from easy to learn.

PowerShot G7

It won't replace your SLR, but it's almost as capable and much more portable.

Hardsleeve

Beautiful and tough - what else do you need from a 'Book case?

Smack Mahjong

In Smack Mahjong, you click matching pairs of tiles to make them disappear. Solitaire and killing time go hand in hand, but we're looking for a new game to help pass those last minutes before quittin' time. We think we found it with Smack Mahjong. The goal is to click on pairs of matching tiles and eliminate them from the board, but you can only select tiles that are free on the left or right. A clock keeps track of your time, so you'll want to work as quickly as possible, but the game doesn't have any sort of leaderboard for bragging rights. 

Tango

Decent looks, decent sound, decent connectivity - but, unfortunately, "decent" doesn't mean "great." With a name like Tango, you might expect dramatic, luscious sound quality from this iPod speaker. What we got from the Tango, however, was a mixed bag of audio results. The Tango has a pair of 2.5-inch midrange speakers, two 1-inch tweeters, and a 4-inch woofer at the bottom of the unit that faces down toward the surface that the speaker sits on. As you'd expect from a speaker with a sizable woofer, the bass from the Tango booms—but with cringe-inducing distortion, even after we turned down the bass. On rock tracks where the bass wasn't as prominent, the Tango did a decent job with midrange sounds, but opera songs lacked clarity.